Monday, 3 September 2012

Miracle Whip Cake


The world can be a traumatic place for cakers when we leave the ruffled curtain comfort of our homes. We have to adapt to new ways of thinking, especially when it comes to food. We learn that orange juice doesn't come from a powder; that whipped cream doesn't come in a container in the freezer section. And we learn that mayonnaise doesn't come in a jar labelled Miracle Whip.

As a condiment, Miracle Whip holds a place of distinction in most caker fridges. It goes into our spinach dips, tuna sandwiches and into our casseroles. In fact, many cakers still use Miracle Whip as a hair conditioner, which explains the funky aroma we have on hot days.

While using mayonnaise in a cake may not seem all that shocking (it replaces the eggs and oil, after all), Miracle Whip takes it to a whole other (caker) dimension. But when taste-tested among cakers and non-cakers alike, this cake got a big thumps up. It's moist, chocolately and light. I guess miracles really do exist.

2 cups flour
1 cup white sugar
4 tablespoons cocoa
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
pinch salt
1 cup cold water
1 cup Miracle Whip
1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix together first 6 ingredients and add all at once the cold water, Miracle Whip and vanilla. Mix just until blended and pour immediately into a greased 9” x 12” greased and floured pan. Bake in 350º oven for 40-45 minutes.

Source: Belleville Shrine Club

10 comments:

  1. My sister made this in home economics class in Granby, Quebec. My kids still enjoy. Although, mine is a little different, it uses white vinegar as well as the miracle whip. I have since replaced the miracle whip with real mayo which seems to work just fine. I enjoy your blog. Thanks.

    Beverly

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    1. Hi Beverly. Thanks for your comment. I'd like to try this recipe with mayo instead of Miracle Whip sometime, just to see if there's much of a difference in the taste. Glad you're enjoying the blog.

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  2. Just heard you on The Next Chapter and really enjoyed the interview. Loved your book Fruit and look forward to choosing Natural Order for my book club pick this year. This was the only way I could find to contact you and I just had to put in my two cents worth on the ritz cracker substitute for apple pie. I'm pretty sure that recipe was created during the war when apples were in short supply and was a palatable substitute. Enjoying your blog as well and will be subscribing to it. One of my favourite cookbooks in my collection would probably be considered a caker cookery book "River Road Recipes II, A Second Helping" produced by the Junior League of Baton Rouge Inc. I love the culture of the collection and the names of the contributors like "Mrs. Roosevelt LeBlanc", Mrs. Iveson B. Noland, III and Mrs. F. E. Mittendorf - you just know her friends call her "Effie" It conjures such colourful images!

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    1. Hi Suzan. I'm glad you enjoyed the interview. I had a lot of fun with Shelagh. I heard once that Mock Apple Pie originally used soda crackers instead of Ritz crackers. Have you ever made it? If not, you should. Whenever I serve it, no one believes that it's not made with real apples. The recipe's on the site. Just do a search and you should find it. I agree that the names of the recipe contributors are part of the charm of these cookbooks.
      Happy to hear you liked Fruit and hope your book club likes Natural Order.

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  3. This sounds rather like "Wacky Cake", which uses oil and eggs rather than Miracle Whip.
    What is the texture like? It looks sort of "brownieish", if that's a word. And if it isn't, it should be.
    Wait a minute--if orange juice doesn't come from a powder, where does it come from ????

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    1. I have a couple of recipes for Wacky Cake, Veg-o-matic, but it's one where you mix everything in the pan - not unlike most caker recipes, I suppose. The texture was light. Kind of airy. It wasn't like a brownie. And I agree that "brownieish" should be a word. I'm going to use it tomorrow. In what context is anyone's guess. Orange juice comes from corn.

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  4. Glad you made this delight - although for some reason I was expecting it to be a white cake, a la Miracle Whip color. I wonder what it would taste like with vanilla instead of cocoa? I think you should make your next cake recipe with money and buttons and crap wrapped in tin foil like we all had at our birthdays in 1978! That's sort of caker, no? I miss those cakes!

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    1. Do you know how many teeth I lost biting down on those foil-wrapped coins as a kid, Vintage Cabin? And don't get me started on the ones I accidentally swallowed. Ever pass a quarter? It's not pretty.

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  5. I just made this and it's delicious! Very moist, very quick and easy. And it works well with fat free Miracle Whip.
    I love caker cooking! Feels like home.

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    1. It's pretty good, isn't it? I was debating about whether to ice it or not, but I passed. I don't think it really needs it, anyway. I'm a little scared that some adventurous caker is going to come up with Miracle Whip icing.

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