Monday, 1 December 2014

Homemade Stove Top Stuffing

Welcome to Caker Cooking’s Caker Christmas Extravaganza!

I’ll post questionable scrumptious caker holiday recipes throughout the month. In addition, I'll also post craft ideas. Don't worry if you're not Michael Angelo. Caker crafts are super-easy and make great gifts for co-workers and other people you sort of care about.

In the three and a half years I’ve been doing this blog, I’ve learned a few things about my fellow cakers. Mainly, that we like man-made fibres and consider Hee Haw high art. Another thing I've learned about cakers? We're perplexing creatures. When I saw this recipe for homemade Stove Top Stuffing, I took my Tilley hat off and gave my head a scratch. I mean, why? Why would cakers go through all the trouble of making something when they could just buy a box?

The answer? Pride. Cakers like nothing more than boasting that processed food isn't limited to the supermarket. You can also make it in the comfort of your own wallpaper-bordered kitchen.

Now, I consider myself a stuffing connoisseur, so I was doubtful about this recipe. But it was delicious and tasted just like the real thing. If you can consider something that's fake real. (Ouch, that thought just hurt my head!) It was salty and savoury and, best of all, I didn’t have to buy a turkey to cook it in. Or even a pigeon, which, in my family, was all we could afford at Christmas.

Yours truly,

Tiny Tim

P.S. Come back Wednesday for a special – and salty! – caker Christmas craft!

1 envelope Lipton Onion Soup Mix
1 cup water
8 cups bread crumbs (cut into ¼” pieces)
1 teaspoon poultry season
½ cup butter

In medium saucepan, add Lipton Onion soup mix to water; bring to boil and simmer 5 min. Stir in poultry seasoning and butter and set aside. Toast bread cubes lightly in moderate over till cubes are dry. In large bowl, add seasoned onion mix gradually to bread cubes, tossing lightly till coated. Return stuffing to saucepan, cover and let stand in warm for 5 min., stirring occasionally.


Source: Madoc Centennial Cookbook - 1978

12 comments:

  1. The thing with cakers is that they enjoy the challenge reproducing a fancy brand name product for a fraction of the price. Although, I have to say in this case, you can't get much cheaper than stove top stuffing! Maybe what happened here is that someone in Madoc had run out of stove top the night before Thanksgiving and had to rely on their own ingenuity and what was on hand in the pantry!

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    Replies
    1. Cakers are resourceful, that's for sure. But you're right. Stove Top is hardly a luxury item. Unlike, say, Kahlua.

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    2. Right you are! By the way, speaking of Kahlua check out the little gem below. I've made it and it's pretty easy. Kahlua is something you never want to run out of, especially around Christmas!

      Homemade Kahlua Recipe

      Ingredients:
      4 cups water
      1 1/2 cups instant coffee crystals
      4 1/2 cups 100 proof vodka
      8 cups sugar
      2 vanilla beans

      Directions:

      Mix water, sugar and coffee crystals. Heat and stir until dissolved. Cool to room temperature. Add vodka. Stir to combine. Pour mixture into 6, 12.5 oz. bottles. Cut each vanilla bean into thirds and drop bean into each bottle. Cap. After 2-3 weeks strain, remove beans and rebottle.

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    3. Thanks for the recipe. Sounds good. (hiccup!) Funnily enough, I was planning to feature homemade Kahlua this month. Although the caker version doesn't have vanilla bean. Surprising to no one.

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  2. Pepperidge Farms would be 'luxury', Stove Top not so much.
    Did you know they make 'Halal' Lipton's Onion Soup Mix?
    Yup, they do! I bought some in Dubai.
    I guess there are Muslim Cakers too?

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    Replies
    1. Bibi, it warms my heart to think that Lipton Onion Soup mix is found - and enjoyed - by people all over the world. I guess it proves that sodium is life's great unifier.

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  3. This recipe reminds me of the current trend of making your own Twinkies, Almond Joys, etc. So, once again, cakers are well ahead of their time! Also, how does one become a stuffing connoisseur?

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    Replies
    1. By eating, like, a LOT of stuffing. I even have a special badge.

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  4. I'm super depressed that your blog is ending. You make me laugh every week...going to miss you!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! Glad you got a few laughs. I did, too.

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  5. Very chunky "bread crumbs". Daring!

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    Replies
    1. It's not daring so much as poor cutting skills. You should see how I masacre onions.

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